Aviator Badges & Their History

Army Aviator Badge

To signify military aviation training and certification, most of the world’s forces use the aviator’s Badge. The Aviator Badge, also known as a Pilot’s Badge or Pilot Wings, was initially designed to acknowledge military aviators’ training and to distinguish them from the “foot soldiers” of the regular ground troops.

What is Aviator Badge?

An eagle with expanded wings resting on crossed swords and a little wattle wreath adorns this silver anodized aluminum voided hat badge for the Australian Army Aviation Corps. The preliminary design is surrounded by a wide oval wreath of wattle, topped by a queen’s crown, and bears the motto’ VIGILANCE.’

Badge Types and Eligibility Criteria

You can see Each Badge’s eligibility conditions in the following paragraphs.

The Basic Badge for Aviation

H.Q., PERSON TAPC-PLP-I may grant a waiver to an individual who meets the following requirements:

Is on flying status (physically qualified-class III)?

Has completed at least 12 months of in-flight duties (which need not be consecutive).

Is the school trained to receive a permanent award for this Badge?

The Basic Aviation Badge is for the Army troops stationed at a Joint Command Post who are part of an operational team flying status and operating the Airborne Command Post. These people may wear the Basic Aviation Badge while assigned to such duties or until they meet the required qualifications for a permanent award. It is possible to receive this Badge while serving as an observer (aerial).

Suppose a soldier has completed advanced individual training (AIT) in (CMF) 67 and (CMF) 93 career management fields and has previously completed AIT in (CMF) 28 career management fields. In that case, they will get the Basic Aviation Badge. It comprises troops who completed AIT for MOS’s in the 68 series while in AIT. Armed forces personnel with the MOS’35L-35M-35Q-35W who have completed a (CMF) 67 AIT before September 30, 1996, and those with the MOS’93C-93P who have completed a (CMF) 67 AIT after December 31, 1985, have been granted authorization based on prior AIT completion documentation.

An additional badge will be issued to those individuals who fulfill all of the requirements for the award of the Army Astronaut Device but are not permitted an Aviator, Flight Surgeon, or Aviation Badge.

Soldiers who complete (CMF) 93 MOS’s AIT get the Aviation Badge, which they can wear on their uniform for life. Before January 1, 1998, personnel who had previously held MOS 93B or MOS 93D and who had previously graduated from a (CMF) 93 AIT before September 30, 1996, were eligible to wear the Badge because their AIT was completed after December 31, 1985.

It is possible for the commander of an army unit that has an Army aircraft assigned to wear the Aviation Badge if they deem it appropriate in the published instructions. To qualify for this position, you must be a flight crew member.

2. Senior Pilot’s Badge

If an individual has completed seven years on flying status (physically qualified-class III) in a primary duty assignment as stated in AR 600-106, they are eligible for this Badge. In (CMF) 67 and 93 as well as (CMF) 150A/151A Warrant Officers, MOS 00Z personnel from the (CMF) 67 or 93 fields, those with ten years of service and satisfy the following conditions may be eligible for the Senior Aviation Badge.

They can only meet this criterion by time on frequent and regular flights, except in transit between PCS postings, including TDY.

This Badge is available to Warrant Officers who have completed seven years of flying status or ten years of service in (CMF) 67 or 93, MOS 151A or 150A, satisfactorily. While serving as a Drill Sergeant or Recruiter, Career Management NCO, Career Advisor, Instructor or Equal Opportunity Advisor, soldiers who maintain (CMF) 67 and 93 will be credited toward this requirement not to exceed 36 months. To meet this criterion, prior-enlisted (CMF) can count 67 hours of MOS 151A experience and 93 hours of MOS 150A experience. To be eligible for this Badge, you must have been born on or after January 1, 1983.

The recipient only gets this award if he has shown total competence in the primary duties that led to recognition.

Attained an E-4 or above on the ACT/SAT

A recommendation from the current unit commander is required.

Master Pilot’s Badge

Golden Pilot Wing Emblem, Badge or Logo Symbol on a white background. 3d Rendering
Golden Pilot Wing Emblem, Badge or Logo Symbol on a white background. 3d Rendering

Anyone who meets the requirements in AR 600-016 for 15 years of flying status (physically qualified-class III) on a primary duty assignment is eligible to receive this Badge upon completion of such duty assignment. All 68 series MOS’, Warrant Officers MOS’ 150A and 151A, may be eligible for this Badge if they have 17 years of service and complete the following requirements:

Only time spent on regular and frequent flights will be considered, save for time spent in transit between PCS postings (including TDY), which it will also recognize.

While serving as a Drill Sergeant or Recruiter, Career Management NCO, Career Advisor, Instructor or Equal Opportunity Advisor, soldiers who maintain (CMF) 67 and 93 will be credited toward this requirement not to exceed 36 months. If a warrant officer in MOS 150A and 151A has served 15 years on flying status or 17 years in (CMF) 67/93 or MOS 150A and 151A, they may be eligible for this Badge. To meet this criterion, prior-enlisted (CMF) can count 67 hours of MOS 151A experience and 93 hours of MOS 150A experience.

She accomplished the primary responsibilities that led to this award with total competence.

An E-6 or above grade is required.

If the unit commander and higher-ranking unit commander accept your recommendation, you’ll get the go-ahead to join.

Australian Aviator Badges

The Royal Australian Air Force uses flying insignia with crowns instead of only pilots’ wings and blue wreaths instead of white to distinguish themselves from the British RAF. The initials “RAAF” appear on the pilot’s flying Badge.

It’s no secret that several Royal Australian Air Force pilots were upset when non-pilot “officer aircrew” were given twin wings in 1998/1999. Allegedly, several currents and former military personnel who had previously held the soon to be dissolved “Half” Wing supported the protest. In the end, the petition got more than 10,000 signatures, but it failed.

History of Aviator Badges

Pilot Wings have recently gained a wider audience than simply the aviation business. You might be wondering why these badges have become so popular and how they’ve come to represent success and fulfillment. We will give you a quick rundown of the origins of pilot wings in this post.

Aviation or aviator badges, often known as pilot wings or wing badges, are awarded to military personnel who have completed their military aviation training. These badges are to recognize the hard effort and commemorate achievements.

In the early 1900s, the first used pilot wings. Having a star in the center of the pilot wings, for example, signifies a specific degree of success. Compared to people with a better experience, those who have finished the course get a different badge than others. Air Service members received their first American Aviator Badges during World War I. Observer, Junior Aviator or Reserve Aviation Officer, and Senior Aviator badges are the names of the badges given in WWI.

In World War II, pilot wings came with a new design for those who survived the conflict. The U.S. Air Force uses polished silver wings as the pilot badges for its pilots. It is possible to claim that these aviator badges are more than military symbols and decorations. They’re also a treasure trove of knowledge. They are no longer restricted to the air force or the aviation sector, as it is now apparent. Many organizations have started to use their emblem to represent performance for their employees and trainees.

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